5/25/18

Regent Law Welcomes Anti-Human Trafficking Victim Advocate Ann Carey

On April 23, 2018, Regent University School of Law hosted Ann Carey, anti-Human trafficking victim advocate for Samaritan House. Carey has 30 years' experience as a litigation attorney, mediator, arbitrator, counselor, and executive director of a non-profit crisis center. 


Carey began her presentation by affirming that her profession is not a job—it is a calling. She then explained how Hampton Roads—because of its location, military presence, and large at-risk youthful population, has become a prime area for human trafficking.

Human trafficking is a crime that affects all citizens of the community, and each good standing member of the society must do everything possible to diminish, if not abolish, it. Carey then explained her role as a victim advocate. Because of her extensive legal experience, God uniquely equipped Carey to attack this issue by providing trafficking survivors with comprehensive legal assistance. Trafficking victims have various legal needs, whether it be obtaining visas, securing a protective order, advocating for custody of minor children, or ensuring that the victims are not charged as criminals. She goes far beyond being a legal counselor; she supports victims to better their lives.



While many still view trafficking victims as criminals, Carey encouraged the audience to embrace survivors as what they really are--human beings that have been severely victimized. Human trafficking survivors, regardless of sex, race, or age, are never victims by choice, but by desperation and manipulation.

Carey's presentation identified that human trafficking is still silenced in our general community. Her presentation reminded Regent Law students to actively pursue justice, especially in the area of human rights—and there are many avenues for each person to make an impact right here in this community.

This event was sponsored by the Asian Pacific American Law Student Association and the Center for Global Justice, Human Rights, and the Rule of Law.





4/25/18

Justice Delay in India

Hello, Everyone!

My name is Maria Cabrera, and this is my last semester with the Center for Global Justice, Human Rights, and the Rule of Law (CGJ). I’m a second-year Master in Law student at Regent University (RU) School of Law. 

With the spring semester barreling to a finish, we finished our legal memo addressing the topic of “judicial delay in India” for Justice Ventures International (JVI). JVI is one of several nonprofits for which the CGJ performs legal work involving human rights.

On January 14, 2018, four retired judges drafted an open letter to Chief Justice Dipak Misra in support of four apex court judges stating how the over-allotment of cases and crisis should settle “within the judiciary.”

The senior Judges of India’s Supreme Court demonstrated their concern because the leading court’s administration randomly assigned cases to benches headed by junior judges. These efforts encourage harmful effects on the administration of justice and the rule of law. Instead, straightforward regulations that are right and fair should govern the distribution of cases among the benches, the open letter declared.

The senior justices expressed their concern of restoring confidence in the judicial system and Supreme Court from India’s citizens. The senior justices went on to comment on why it’s important that the five most senior Judges of the Court settle cases. The people of India need the assurance that the Supreme Court operates in a “transparent” manner with the Chief Justice using power correctly to reach verdicts.

Justice Chelameswar said, “We have tried to convince Chief Justice that certain things are not in order and remedial measures are needed… Democracy cannot survive in this or in any country if these remedial measures are not put in place.”


The Supreme Court of India retrieved from Daily Mail.

This post was written by a Center for Global Justice student staff member.  The views expressed in this post do not necessarily reflect those of Regent University, Regent Law School, or the Center for Global Justice.

4/23/18

CGJ Publication Persuades Uganda Parliamentarians to Protect Life

The following post was written by Moriah Schmit, a CGJ student staff member, Law Clerk and third-year Regent Law student.

The right to life is protected in Uganda’s Constitution, and this right specifically prohibits terminating the life of an unborn child.

Last spring, the Center for Global Justice heard that Uganda Parliamentarians were debating whether to legalize abortion in Uganda. The Center was asked to partner with Uganda Christian University (UCU) in writing a memo in response to the bill, urging Parliamentarians to choose life.

The memo focused on Africa’s unique culture and heritage, encouraging them not to be influenced by Western neo-colonialist theories, which do not support the country’s ideals and heritage. We gathered principles of science, of AfricanThe right to life is protected in Uganda’s Constitution, and this right specifically prohibits terminating the life of an unborn child. Last spring, the Center for Global Justice heard that Uganda Parliamentarians were debating whether to legalize abortion in Uganda.

The Center was asked to partner with Uganda Christian University (UCU) in writing a white paper in response to the bill, urging Parliamentarians to choose life. The memo focused on Africa’s unique culture and heritage, encouraging them not to be influenced by Western neo-colonialist theories. We argued that Uganda is not obligated to legalize abortion based on principles of international law nor should it do so as a policy matter. We rejoice that Dr. Senyonyi reported to us that Uganda choose not to move forward with the bill and that our paper played a key part in that decision. history, of medicine, and statistics demonstrating why abortion would not be beneficial to Uganda.

Our research included a summary of the harmful effects of abortion, such as problems with sex-selective abortion and lack of adequate healthcare facilities. We of course also argued that Uganda is not legally obligated to legalize abortion under international or domestic law—contrary to what our opponents—including Planned Parenthood—were saying.

On Friday, April 13, Center Directors Jeff Brauch and Ernie Walton met with the Vice Chancellor of UCU, who shared the great news that Uganda has once again chosen to protect life, in large part because of the memo put together by the Center for Global Justice and UCU. It’s amazing to see what God does with our efforts and research!


This post was written by a Center for Global Justice student staff member.  The views expressed in this post do not necessarily reflect those of Regent University, Regent Law School, or the Center for Global Justice.

4/17/18

CGJ Student Staff Update from Graduating 3L Shannon Fields

This semester I had the privilege of writing a memo for the International Justice Mission.



In August 2017, the police began murdering and raping civilians in a certain nation after a presidential election. Hundreds of citizens were harmed during the violence without any charges ever being brought.

One of the reasons why no one has been charged is because the victims have not been able to identify the individual officers. However, the victims know for certain that the perpetrators were police officers. To remedy this issue, IJM is looking into the legal doctrine of “command responsibility.”

This doctrine holds those in authority, like police commanders, responsible for the control over and actions of their subordinates. Thus, the doctrine goes after the superiors rather than the subordinates, making the issue of individual identification irrelevant. If each element of the doctrine can be met, then a case could move forward with criminal charges against the police commanders for refusing to control their police force.

This has by far been the most difficult project I have had throughout my time at the Center, but it has also been the most rewarding. I am truly honored to have been a part of such an amazing organization for the past two and a half years.

My law school experience would certainly not have been the same without the Center for Global Justice.

This post was written by a Center for Global Justice student staff member.  The views expressed in this post do not necessarily reflect those of Regent University, Regent Law School, or the Center for Global Justice.

Update from CGJ Student Staff 1L Joseph Woltmann

My name is Joseph Woltmann, and I am currently a 1L student serving as a student staff member for the Center for Global Justice.


Since serving as student staff for the Center for Global Justice, I have been fortunate to work on a project for Shared Hope International.  This project focuses on alternative processes to juvenile delinquency and how each state addresses victims of human trafficking. This project has taught me the importance of alternative processes to delinquency, such as Child in Need of Supervision/Services (CHINS).  Processes like CHINS demonstrate how victims can be recognized by the system and receive specialized services.

Many states have an alternative process which recognize victims; however, not all of these states give victims access to specialized services.  Even without providing access to specialized services, these processes still promote the best interests of the child, which is far better than delinquency processes.
Much progress has been made to aid child victims and states are further progressing in their ability to recognize and treat victims.  For example, some states provide legal alternatives, such as Diversion, to delinquents.  Diversion allows for juveniles convicted of prostitution to be placed in specialized treatment rather than juvenile detention.

This project has taught me much about how each state is unique in its bid to protect and aid child victims.  The first step is recognition, the second: treatment.  Most states have reached the first step, and other states have reached the second step.  States can learn from each other on how to approach victims, and through this mutual learning, victims will be able to receive the best care and treatment.

This post was written by a Center for Global Justice student staff member.  The views expressed in this post do not necessarily reflect those of Regent University, Regent Law School, or the Center for Global Justice.

4/13/18

Can National Courts be a Driving Force for Prosecuting Crimes Against Humanity?

My name is Jordan Ordway and I am a 2L student staff member with the Center for Global Justice, Human Rights, and Rule of Law at Regent. This semester I am so blessed to be researching a project for International Justice Mission!


My research has focused on the complementarity principle--the idea that national courts can be a driving force for prosecuting serious crimes against humanity. Working for the Center for Global Justice, it may seem counterintuitive to advocate for a position where atrocities that are usually labeled as international crimes should be tried on a domestic level within a State. However, my research makes me believe that this principle is a refreshing option to an old problem that many victims and nations face.

International and hybrid (International-national) tribunals are limited in what individuals will be prosecuted, namely focusing on the highly responsible “mastermind” types. The problem lies with many of the victims who feel they are without relief and that their perpetrators are without accountability. National trials however often ensure efforts to hold perpetrators accountable and have resonance with local populations/victims.

This idea can be exemplified by the local grassroots Gacaca trials within communities of Rwanda after the 1994 Rwandan genocide. While it may be true these trials have had challenges of their own, often times these trials were held simply to give victims a voice and to give accountability for the atrocities that occurred. It showed that the first step to rebuilding a community that has gone through tragedy together is to rebuild together. “The reconciliation process in Rwanda focuses on reconstructing the Rwandan identity, as well as balancing justice, truth, peace and security”.

Colossians 3:13-15 states, “Bear with each other and forgive one another if any of you has a grievance against someone. Forgive as the Lord forgave you. And over all these virtues put on love, which binds them all together in perfect unity. Let the peace of Christ rule in your hearts, since as members of one body you were called to peace. And be thankful.” I believe God calls Christians to be the upholders of peaceful community and I have gained a new-found respect for the complementarity principle’s place in that calling.


This post was written by a Center for Global Justice student staff member.  The views expressed in this post do not necessarily reflect those of Regent University, Regent Law School, or the Center for Global Justice.

4/9/18

Combatting a Flourishing Darkness: Regent Law Hosts Symposium on Human Trafficking

There are more slaves in the world now than there has ever been in history — roughly 45.8 million. For some, that’s 45.8 million too many.

On Friday, March 23, Regent University’s School of Law hosted the 4th Annual Journal of Global Justice and Public Policy Symposium on Human Trafficking.

The Symposium was hosted by the Journal of Global Justice and Public Policy;
the Center for Global Justice, Human Rights, and the Rule of Law;
and the Asian Pacific American Law Student Association

Two panels of three speakers each presented findings, cases, issues and solutions surrounding the global industry.

The first provided an overview of the causes of human trafficking and the forms it takes both domestically and internationally — a bird’s eye view of sorts. The second took a closer look at the difficulties in combatting the issue locally.

Panel 1: International Sex and Labor Trafficking

“It occurs everywhere in every part of society, in the wealthiest parts of society and the poorest parts of society, and all over the world,” said Dr. Jeffrey Brauch, Regent University School of Law LL.M. program director and executive director for the Center for Global Justice.

He believes human trafficking stems from a “basic problem about the way we see human beings.”

Organ trafficking, sex trafficking, labor trafficking and forcing children into soldiering are the main four forms.

“[Human trafficking] reflects the depravity of the human heart … that’s part of what takes place in human trafficking,” he said. “The other thing is, I think this can only occur in every form human trafficking, because people view others … as objects, to be used, to be bought, or sold.”

Among various social and economic issues, LAW alumna Sarah Breyer ’16 discussed how “cultural attitudes” toward people like women and children are a chief issue as they create an environment in which human trafficking thrives.

Her organization, Shared Hope, drafts a report in which each state in the United States is evaluated on its anti-human trafficking policy and laws, and provides a recommendation of positive steps law and policymakers can take.

They also equip ambassadors to educate others about the dangers of human trafficking and how to not only recognize it but also to protect their community from it.

“Informed communities mean informed families,” said Breyer. “Informed families can better protect their children, and those children can better protect their peers.”

Following Breyer, Laura Lederer of Global Centurion — an anti-human trafficking non-profit — shared findings on the health-related issues victims of trafficking experience; 99 percent have a general health problem, 95.1 percent experienced some form of physical violence, 88 percent undergo depression, and 84 percent admitted to abusing substances.

Aside from those, Laderer said 45 percent of trafficking victims attempt suicide, five times the rate of the national average.

LAW alumna Danielle Gallaher ’14 opened the second panel. In her talk, Gallaher, the Delaware County, Pennsylvania Assistant District Attorney for the Special Victims, discussed the struggles and triumphs a prosecutor faces when working cases pertaining to trafficking.

Panel 2: Domestica Human Trafficking from a Law Enforcement Perspective


“I want to orient you guys to the prosecution of sex crimes in general,” said Gallaher. “If you don’t understand that dynamic, you’re not gonna understand sex trafficking.”

LAW alumnus Scott Alleman ’02 understands prosecution well — and human trafficking too.

“These types of cases really do have difficulties involved, even more so than a regular sexual assault one,” said Alleman, sharing experience from a 15-year career as a prosecutor working human trafficking cases. “Sexual assault cases are the most difficult to try as a prosecutor.”

As a prosecutor, Alleman said one of the greatest challenges he’s faced in these cases is the argument that a suspect’s actions were consensual.

Sometimes traffickers control their victims with fear and manipulation according to Alleman — manipulation to the extent that many sex workers and trafficked women involved in the cases he handled, defended their exploiters in court.

And sometimes, the money to be made, or the temporary and feigned affirmation pimp’s often offer, entice some to willingly become sex workers.

Regardless of their reason for entering the horrific industry, all “just want someone to say, ‘You’ve got value,’” said Alleman.

As a local combatant of human trafficking, Ebony Velasquez, the Human Trafficking Task Force coordinator for the Office of the Attorney General in the Commonwealth of Virginia, shared her experience working on the homefront in the Hampton Roads area.

Areas such as this, which experiences relatively heavy tourism and travel — Hampton Roads has an international airport and the third largest shipping port on the east coast — are prime targets for traffickers, Velasquz said.

“[Human trafficking] destroys a sense of community; it destroys the quality of life in that community,” said keynote speaker and School of Law professor Kathleen McKee.

Banquet Lunch with Regent Law Professor Kathleen McKee

She compared the dilemma to, “a puzzle that doesn’t come with a picture on top.”

“For that puzzle to be fully assembled, it requires every person in this room to be informed and engaged,” McKee said. “Informed as to what trafficking is, informed as to who the other players in detecting trafficking are, and encouraging that they are trained to be able to detect the signs of human trafficking and engaged.”