5/12/17

Regent University’s School of Law’s LL.M. Programs Given A+ Ranking by The International Jurist


In May 2017, The International Jurist released its latest issue featuring the best LL.M. programs. Regent University’s School of Law (LAW) received an “A+” ranking in its “Best Value Law Schools” category.

The issue honors “the most robust programs for foreign attorneys” in the areas of Academics, Best Law School, Experience, Career Opportunities and Best Value. Regent’s LL.M. programs were ranked above law schools such as UNC School of Law, Wake Forest University, Georgia State University and Ohio State University.

“I’m very proud of the Regent faculty, because they worked very hard to achieve that goal,” said director of LL.M. programs and LAW associate professor Kathleen McKee. “It’s nice to be able to say to them, ‘I know you worked hard, but here are the fruits of your labor.’”

The LL.M. programs – which include both American Legal Studies and Human Rights – are designed for students who have already received JDs and wish to pursue more concentrated areas of study.

The American Legal Studies program is an online, on-campus or hybrid concentration of study geared for graduates of accredited law institutions outside the United States who are fulfilling requirements to practice American law. The LL.M. in Human Rights is offered exclusively on campus, providing a biblical focus of study for those seeking advanced learning in international, regional and domestic human rights.

The rankings for “Best Value” considered whether LL.M. students could participate in law journals, the typical foreign student enrollment, percentage of students receiving a scholarship, and room and board costs for one year.

Apart from the “value” of the LL.M. programs as distinguished by The International Jurist, McKee believes their true worth is found in the credentials of the faculty and the rigor of the courses themselves.

McKee explained that for the area of American Legal Studies in particular, she witnesses faculty members going above and beyond helping students succeed, especially those seeking an education from outside of the United States. And while McKee said the superior ranking of her programs is an honor, she gives credit where it’s due:

“It’s really not about me,” she said. “It’s about the fact that I work with an incredible group of faculty.”

By Brett Wilson Tubbs

5/3/17

Student Staff Update: Maria Cabrera

My name is Maria Cabrera, and this is my first year with the Center for Global Justice, Human Rights, and the Rule of Law (CGJ). I am a first-year Masters in Law student with Regent University. My favorite part of the CGJ is learning about people and different cultures throughout the world.

Hello, Everyone.

As the spring semester ends, I must confess I feel special because I was asked to help research and study Turkey. Turkey is a land rich in history, the arts, intellectual achievements, and fortitude. I only hope that Turkey will channel her gifts to continue to build the next generation in Turkey and carry her torch as the only secular Muslim nation in the world and that light bear a moral compass to exercise good when under fire.

As a leader, President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan possesses an uncanny popularity and charisma that could make a difference for the better in Turkey and the surrounding region for freedom. His acumen as a businessman could help build a more independent Turkey, ruling with immediate reason and the rule of law as his friend and not his enemy.

It has been six months since Turkish authorities unjustly imprisoned United States Pastor Andrew Brunson in Turkey. Currently, Turkey is in a State of Emergency and securing a trial date may be a challenge.

According to the American Center for Law and Justice (ACLJ), Attorney Aysun Aksehirlioğlu for Pastor Brunson “released a statement indicating the lack of evidence that Pastor Brunson had a membership or any other relationship with cited organization.”

The ACLJ continues to say that on a recent visit to Turkey, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson presented Pastor Brunson’s case directly with President Erdoğan suggesting that an indictment might be forthcoming.

More than ever before, wisdom, understanding, and compassion demonstrate the need for a comprehensive approach for the United States and Turkey regarding the freedom of one husband and father, Pastor Brunson.

This post was written by a Center for Global Justice student staff member.  The views expressed in this post do not necessarily reflect those of Regent University, Regent Law School, or the Center for Global Justice.

CGJ Student Staff Update: Toolkit

Greetings! My name is Brandan Goodwin and I am finishing up my 1L year at Regent University School of Law. I am from Traverse City, Michigan and came to Regent because of many opportunities afford to me by this wonderful university in both advancing my academic career and my spiritual journey. I developed a wonderful relationship with Professor Walton and joined the Center for Global Justice, Human Rights and the Rule of Law. My first project was for Justice Ventures International and was focused on conducting a Business Toolkit for Freedom Business.

These Freedom Businesses are established for victims of human trafficking to get back onto their feet and develop modern economic skills to reintegrate into society. JVI provides such a wonderful service to not only combat trafficking but to create a solution to keeping these victims out of recurring traumatic situations. This Toolkit establishes a guide for developing 501(c)(3) non-profit businesses. It gives these emerging businesses a basic guideline to what documents need to be filed to gain this tax-exempt status and also what is important to file with the state to become a legal entity. This service is monumental because these non-profits do not have huge capital resources to pay for a business attorney to conduct all of this background paperwork and we at the Center can provide a basic guide that can be double checked by a licensed attorney and help these business save money and get to helping the oppressed.

The work that the Center does on projects like this one is monumental to these organizations in the work they do to help the poor and the oppressed. I am grateful for these wonderful opportunities that the Center has afforded me to help further the Christian mission and doing meaningful work in the world. For more information on JVI See - http://www.justiceventures.org.


This post was written by a Center for Global Justice student staff member.  The views expressed in this post do not necessarily reflect those of Regent University, Regent Law School, or the Center for Global Justice.

4/26/17

CGJ Student Staff Update: Shannon Fields


This semester I had the privilege to work on a project for Shared Hope. My team and I researched statutes that could be used to prosecute facilitators of human trafficking and victim offenders/bottom girls. Shared Hope uses our research and analysis to determine whether a state’s statutes specifically target the individuals they were written to convict or if the state’s statutes are too broad. Shared Hope then gives each state legislature a grade to indicate how well their statutes are targeting their intended recipient. Then, ideally, the state legislatures will make the necessary changes to more narrowly target the individuals responsible for trafficking offenses. It is tedious work, but it is a privilege to have the opportunity to influence state trafficking statutes across the country. Nothing in law school has been more rewarding than the work I have done for the Center for Global Justice.

This post was written by a Center for Global Justice student staff member.  The views expressed in this post do not necessarily reflect those of Regent University, Regent Law School, or the Center for Global Justice.

4/25/17

CGJ Student Staff Update: Brandan Goodwin

Hello all and God Bless! My name is Brandan Goodwin and I am finishing up my 1L year at Regent University School of Law. I am on the student staff at the Center for Global Justice, Human Rights and the Rule of Law. The Center has allowed me a wonderful opportunity this summer to go and work with the Parliament of Mongolia and participate in a study abroad partnered with Handong International Law School.

What an amazing opportunity! I am very excited to work with the Mongolian Parliaments only Christian Parliamentary and do meaningful legal work in advancing the rights of Christians and the Rule of Law.  I will be going June 15 – August 5. During this time I will be splitting time between both the parliamentarian’s office and working with the Mongolia Rule of Law institute working on meaningful projects to further rule of law across the region.  This is an a wonderful chance do to meaningful legal work outside of the lectures or classroom and work on projects that have a real world impact for the people of another nation.

This post was written by a Center for Global Justice student staff member.  The views expressed in this post do not necessarily reflect those of Regent University, Regent Law School, or the Center for Global Justice.

4/21/17

Regent Law Students Take First Place in Ukraine Competition

Natasha (L) and Chelsea (R) with their Coach, Regent Law Professor Jim Davids

Third-year law students Chelsea Mack and Natasha Delille, both former CGJ interns and student staff members, took first place at the Third Annual Ukrainian Student Summit in Dnepopetrovsk, Ukraine.

This year the competition consisted of 22 teams from Ukraine, Poland, Romania, and the U.S., and the topic was The Challenge to Democracy in Increasing Globalization.

The purpose of the ІІІ International Student Summit is raising the level of education of applicants of Higher Education on topical issues of modern state processes law-making and law enforcement in Ukraine; increasing positive image of the legal profession; gaining the practical experience during the communication with scientists, politicians, practicing lawyers, representatives of state and local governments; improving legal education in Ukraine; further development of the institution of the national idea as the driving force of national progress in Ukraine etc.

Chelsea and Natasha presented on judicial reform in Ukraine and used examples from NYC and Uganda to show practical steps that Ukraine can take to become a greater democratic nation in the age of globalization.

4/19/17

CGJ Student Staff Update from Lorri Ann Drazan

The spring semester (my last semester as a first year in law school…yikes!) is coming to a close. The work I am doing on Shared Hope’s Protected Innocence Challenge is also coming to a close. As a team, the student staff working on this project, has analyzed all 50 U.S. states and their respective statutes on sex trafficking facilitators. I have personally analyzed nine states, including my home state of Texas. I have learned that even statutes intended for good, to punish sex trafficking facilitators, can sometimes have unforeseen consequences. The unforeseen consequences that we are particularly interested in are the repercussions on victim-offenders. Victim-offenders are distinct from facilitators, because facilitators typically act in order to financially benefit. Two of the concerns that victim-offenders face are (1) being required to register as a sex-offender and (2) the termination of parental rights. Myself and the other student staff members on this project look at state statutes regarding the facilitation of sex trafficking to see if there is a requirement that the act be done to derive a financial benefit. If a financial benefit component is not required, then victim-offenders could potentially be prosecuted for “facilitating” sex trafficking. It has been my pleasure to work on a project that gives a voice to the victims of sex trafficking. It is my hope that our research can be used by Shared Hope to propose constructive feedback to state legislators.

This post was written by a Center for Global Justice student staff member.  The views expressed in this post do not necessarily reflect those of Regent University, Regent Law School, or the Center for Global Justice.